Advanced Placement Chemistry

 

Meeting Time:          

The course runs for 36 weeks and meets a minimum of 275 minutes per week.             

Lab Times:

The lab runs for 36 weeks and meets a minimum of 165 minutes per week and completes a minimum of 26 laboratory activities.                     

 

 

Course Description:

This course is designed to be the equivalent of the general chemistry course usually taken during the first college year. For some students, this course enables them to undertake, as freshmen, second-year work in the chemistry sequence at their institution or to register for courses in other fields where general chemistry is a prerequisite. For other students, the AP Chemistry course fulfills the laboratory science requirement and frees time for other courses.

 

Advance Placement Chemistry provides an orderly development of the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry with an emphasis on inquiry and critical thinking skills including: problem solving, mathematical reasoning, and experimental investigations. Topics of study include: structure of matter, states of matter, chemical reactions, and descriptive chemistry. Laboratory work is an integral component of this course. Technology including graphing calculators, probeware, graphing and data analysis software, and chemistry apparatus is used throughout this course.

 

Our system has an open enrollment policy, but students should understand that this course is described the by the College Board to be a second year chemistry course, and the equivalent of a yearlong introductory, college level general chemistry course. The course requires a working knowledge of chemistry, and second-year algebra. The breadth, pace, and depth of material covered exceeds the standard high school chemistry course, as does the college-level textbook, laboratory work, and time and effort required of students.

 

 

 

 

 

Course Purpose and Goals:

Philosophy

Scientific inquiry is the basis of this course. Scientific inquiry is defined as the diverse ways in which scientists study the natural world and propose explanations based on the evidence derived from their work. Scientific inquiry also refers to the activities through which students develop knowledge and understanding of scientific ideas, as well as an understanding of how scientists study the natural world (NSTA, 2004). This includes active use of the well-designed investigation in which students: 1) form testable questions and hypotheses, 2) design and conduct appropriate investigative procedures, including the identification and control of appropriate variables, 3) organize, display and critically analyze results, 4) draw inferences, summarize results and develop conclusions, and 5) communicate their results for critique by others. Based on the philosophy that scientific knowledge is best acquired through inquiry, the course uses a variety of techniques to promote inquiry in the classroom (ex. multiple revisions, high quality questioning, synthesis, making conclusions based on evidence, etc).

 

Instruction is designed and sequenced to provide students with learning opportunities in the appropriate settings. They include laboratories, classrooms, forms of technology, and field studies. Teaching strategies include in depth laboratory investigations, demonstrations, collaborative peer-to-peer discussions, and student hands-on experiences. Inquiry requires adequate and timely access to the technology of scientific investigations including computers, internet and online resources, probeware, graphing calculators, databases, spreadsheets, word processes and presentation software, as well as the experimental apparatus of chemistry.

 

 

Goals

1.      To understand the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry through the investigation of chemical phenomena, theories and experimental methods.

2.      To develop problem solving skills, and mathematical reasoning, through the active asking and answering of testable questions, and employing the components of a well-designed experimental investigation.

3.      To foster scientific habits of mind including curiosity, creativity, and objectivity.

4.      To understand the interconnections of chemistry to the other sciences, society, culture, and technology.

 

 

 

 

 

Conceptual Organization:

 

The students are exposed to the equivalent of a college introductory chemistry course, meaning that the content and level of depth of the material is equivalent to a college level course. As with university courses, it is expected that students will be independent learners. Scientific inquiry is an integral component of this course, the elements of the well-designed investigation and the nature of the scientific methods are taught within the context of the topics, rather than treated as a separate introductory unit. As students investigate phenomena they extend their understanding of forming testable questions and hypotheses. Laboratory techniques are learned in the direct application of their use, rather than as a generic exercise isolated from their setting of application. Methods to collect, organize and display data are taught within the authentic use of real experimental data. This approach of learning uses the investigative skills within and throughout the authentic need of using and applying the skills.

The topics and their order of sequence within the course are provided to develop a strong conceptual understanding of chemistry, and serve as a conceptual framework for the laboratories conducted throughout the course. The content and level of depth of the material is equivalent to a college level course. Studies begin with the larger, macroscopic view of chemical phenomena including nomenclature, stoichiometry, and thermochemistry. This early introduction to thermochemistry provides appropriate foundations for developing understandings of chemical processes. Concepts in atomic structure are then introduced to serve as a foundation for the understanding of electron energy levels and the periodic relationships associated with atomic radii, ionization energies, electron affinities and oxidation states. This provides the basis for understanding chemical bonding and the role of geometry of molecules on properties and bonding, and intermolecular interactions. Understanding the structure of matter provides the conceptual framework for the gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, states of matter and solution chemistry. This conceptual development serves as the backdrop for an examination of the factors that determine the speed and extent of chemical reactions including kinetics, equilibria, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Studies in nuclear chemistry then follow with a final survey of organic chemistry, biochemistry and the chemistry of nonmetals, and metals. Throughout the course connections to descriptive chemistry, modern materials, and environmental chemistry are provided to make real world connections among chemistry, the environment, and societal issues.

 

The order of topics within the course, not only provides a logical and systemic study to chemistry, but also accommodates transfer of students within the schools of the District, so that transfer students can maintain a consistent flow of learning.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Format and Policies:

 

This school system calculates weighted grades for students who complete an Advanced Placement (AP) Course.

 

Unweighted Scale A=4             Weighted Scale A=5

Unweighted Scale B=3             Weighted Scale B=4

Unweighted Scale C=2             Weighted Scale C=3

Unweighted Scale D=1             Weighted Scale D=2

Unweighted Scale F=0             Weighted Scale F=0

 

Instructor:         Jason Just, Room A103                       Voice:  952.232.3404, 952.469.1304 

E-Mail:              jljust@isd194.k12.mn.us                     www:    http://staff.isd194.k12.mn.us/~jljust/

           

Required each day in class

·                     Textbook

·                     3-Ring Lecture Notebook (3”) - Keep Chapter Syllabuses, Handouts, Classroom Notes, Chapter Outlines, and Completed Tests.

·                     Notebook paper, Pencil and pen

·                     Lab Notebook:  3-Ring (2 1/2”) or spiral bound

·                     Calculator:  Logarithmic and Scientific Notation functions.

 

Grading scale:

A          100-94             B          86-83               C          76-73               D          66-63

A-         93-90               B-         82-80               C-         72-70               D-         62-60

B+        89-87               C+        79-77               D+        69-67               F          59-0

 

Chemistry will consist of the approximate grade break down:

10% Citizenship and Attendance

55% Tests and Quizzes

35% Daily Work and Laboratory Write-ups and Quizzes

 

Citizenship is taking an active role learning in the classroom. Citizenship is (but is not limited to):

·                     Safe, active participation in laboratory activities (e.g., written data collection)

·                     Active participation in classroom discussions

·                     Active, on-task, note-taking during lectures

·                     Active, on-task, reading, writing and production of reports and syntheses

·                     Active, on-task, completion of homework assignments.

All students are expected to physically and mentally participate in the active roles of classroom learning citizenship.

Attendance is physical and mental participation during the course of a class period.

 

The instructor reserves the right to arbitrate citizenship and attendance for each student. Exceptions may be made for extenuating circumstanced depending upon the situation and the student.

 

Grades will be based on a point-based system. Letter grades will be issued on the percentage of total possible points accumulated throughout the semester.

Late/Missing work:

All assignments, and projects are to be turned in at the beginning of the class period on the due date.  Assignments that are late will receive 50% of the original grade.  Assignments for a particular unit will no longer be accepted after the day of that unit’s test.

It is your responsibility to get your missed assignments. If you miss…

·        The day an assignment is due, you’ll be expected to turn that homework in the day you get back (especially if absence was for a field trip or school activity)

·        The day the assignment was given out, you will receive one extra day on the due date

·        A day or two before the due date, but were present when the assignment was given, you are expected to turn in the assignment on the original due date

·        The scheduled due date with an unexcused absence (i.e., you skipped), you lose 25% of the assignment value right off the top. Credit may not be earned for the work or projects completed during the absence.

It is your responsibility to get your missed quizzes and tests. If you miss…

·        The scheduled quiz/test day, you’ll be expected to take the quiz/test the day you get back (especially if absence was for a field trip or school activity)

·        A day or two before a quiz/test, but were present for the review you are expected to take the quiz/test on the scheduled day

·        The review day, and are back on the scheduled quiz/test day, you must take the quiz/test the NEXT DAY (day after the scheduled test day)

·        The scheduled quiz/test day with an unexcused absence, (i.e., you skipped) you lose 25% of the quiz/test points off the top. Credit may not be earned for the work or projects completed during the absence.

Exceptions may be made for extenuating circumstanced depending upon the situation and the student.

 

Textbook, Materials and Other Resources:

Required Textbook

Supplemental Textbooks and Readings

 

 

 

Other Resources:

·        Laboratory classroom that includes the space, facilities and equipment to conduct hands-on, inquiry-based investigations including molecular model kits, analytical balances, titration apparatus, kinetic-molecular model apparatus, calorimeters, centrifuges, volumetric glassware, vacuum pumps, separatory apparatus 

·        Data gathering, graphing, analysis, virtual laboratory and presentation software including Logger Pro, Graphical Analysis, Excel and Power Point, Model ChemLab.

·        Graphing calculators: TI-83+

·        Podcasting of daily lectures and assignments via internet: http://staff.isd194.k12.mn.us/~jljust/

·        Classroom sets of laptop computer interfaces: Macintosh iBook and Dell Inspiron 500.

·        Vernier Labpro interfaces and probeware including colorimeters, ion-selective electrodes, temperature probes, pressure, pH and conductivity sensors.

·        Internet access and online resources including:

 

o       AP Chemistry Online: http://staff.isd194.k12.mn.us/~jljust/

o       AP Central: http://apcentral.collegeboard.com/apc/Controller.jpf

o       Vernier Technologies: http://www.vernier.com/cmat/chema.html

o       Chemistry Teacher Resources: http://www.flinnsci.com/resources_display.asp?catID=2

 

 

 

Course Content Outline:

 

 

Unit

Quarter

Week

Topics

Laboratory

 Major Assessments

1-2

Matter, Atoms, Molecules and Ions

1

1-2

Classification of matter,

Properties of matter,

Atomic theory,

Atomic structure,

Atomic weights,

Periodic table,

Molecules/molecular compounds,

Ions and ionic compounds,

Naming inorganic compounds,

Simple organic compounds

Identification of Substances by Physical Properties

 

Separation of the Components of a Mixture

Chapter 1-2

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

3

Stoichiometry

1

2-3

Chemical equations,

Patterns of chemical reactivity,

Formula weights,

Mole,

Empirical formulas from analyses,

Quantitative info from balanced equations,

Limiting reactants

Chemical Reactions: Determination of the Ratio of Reactants in a Chemical Equation

 

Chemical Formulas Analysis of a Hydrate

Test: Chapters 1-3

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

4

Aqueous Reactions and Solution Stoichiometry

1

4-5

Properties of aqueous solutions,

Precipitation reactions,

Acid-base reactions,

Oxidation-reduction reactions,

Concentrations of solutions,

Solution stoichiometry and chemical analysis

 

Gravimetric Analysis of a Salt

 

Determination of the Concentration of a Solution: Beer’s Law

 

Test: Chapter 4

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

5

Thermo-chemistry

1

6-7

Energy,

First law of thermodynamics,

Enthalpy,

Enthalpies of reaction,

Calorimetry,

Hess’s law,

Enthalpies of formation,

Food and fuels

Enthalpy Determination by Hess Law and Calorimetry

Test: Chapter 5

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Quarter Assessment: Units 1-5

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

6

Electronic Structure of Atoms

2

8

Line spectra & Bohr model,

Quantum mechanics & atomic orbitals,

Representations of orbitals,

Many-electron atoms,

Electron configurations,

Electron configs & periodic table

Atomic Spectra and Atomic Structure

Laboratory Journals

7

Periodic Properties of the Elements

2

9-10

Development of periodic table,

Effective nuclear charge,

Sizes of atoms & ions,

Ionization energy,

Electron affinities,

Metals, nonmetals, & metalloids,

Group trends for the active metals,

Group trends for some nonmetals

 

Test: Chapters 6-7

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

8

Basic Concepts of Chemical Bonding

2

11-12

Chemical bonds, Lewis symbols & octet rule,

Ionic bonding,

Covalent bonding,

Bond polarity & electronegativity,

Drawing Lewis structures,

Resonance structures,

Exceptions to the octet rule,

Strengths of covalent bonds

Molecular Geometries of Covalent Molecules: Lewis Structures and VSEPR Theory

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

9

Molecular Geometry and Bonding Theories

2

13-14

Molecular Shapes,

VSEPR,

Shape & molecular polarity,

Covalent bonding & orbital overlap,

Hybrid orbitals,

Multiple bonds,

Molecular orbitals,

2nd-row diatomic molecules

 

Test: Chapters 7-9

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

Laboratory Journals

10

Gases

2

15-16

Characteristics of gases,

Pressure,

Gas laws,

Ideal-gas equation,

Applications of ideal-gas equation,

Gas mixtures & partial pressures,

Kinetic-molecular theory,

Molecular effusion & diffusion,

Real gases: deviation from ideal

Behavior of Gases: Collect “x” liters of a gas.

 

Determination of the Molar Volume of a Gas

Test: Chapter 10

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

11

Inter-molecular Forces, Liquids, and Solids

2

17-18

Molecular comparison liquids/solids,

Intermolecular forces,

Properties of liquids,

Phase changes,

Vapor pressure,

Phase diagrams,

Structures of solids,

Bonding in solids

 

Determination of Intermolecular Forces: Evaporation and Intermolecular Attractions

Test : Chapter 11

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

12

Modern Materials

2

18

Liquid crystals,

Polymers,

Biomaterials,

Ceramics,

Superconductivity,

Thin films

 

 

 

Semester 1 Assessment

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

 

13

Properties of Solutions

3

19

Solution process,

Saturated solutions & solubility,

Factors affecting solubility,

Expressing concentration,

Colligative properties,

Colloids

Colligative Properties: Freezing-Point Depression and Molar Mass

Test: Chapter 13

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

 

Laboratory Journals

14

Chemical Kinetics

3

20-21

Factors affect reaction rates,

Reaction rates,

Concentration & rate,

Change of concentration with time,

Temperature & rate,

Reaction mechanisms,

Catalysis

Rates of Chemical Reactions I: A Clock Reaction

 

Rates of Chemical Reactions II: Rate and Order of H2O2 Decomposition

 

Test: Chapter 14

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

15

Chemical Equilibrium

3

22

Concept of equilibrium,

Equilibrium constant,

Heterogeneous equilibria,

Calculating equilibrium constants,

Applications of equilibrium constants,

Le Châtelier’s principle

Determination of Kc using spectrophotometry

 

Using  Le Châtelier’s Principle to Determine the State of a Reaction

 

Test: Chapter 15

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

 

Laboratory Journals

16

Acid-Base Equilibria

3

23-24

Acids & bases,

Brønsted-Lowery acids & bases,

Autoionization of water,

pH scale,

Strong acids & bases,

Weak acids,

Weak bases,

Relationship between Ka & Kb,

Acid-base properties of salt solutions,

Acid-base behavior & chemical structure,

Lewis acids & bases

Determination of Dissociation Constant of a Weak Acid

 

 

Test: Chapter 16

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

17

Additional Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria

3

25-26

Common ion effect,

Buffered solutions,

Acid-base titrations,

Solubility equilibria,

Factors that affect solubility,

Precipitation & separation ions

Titration Curves of Acids and Bases

 

Determination of the Solubility-Product Constant for a Sparingly Soluble Salt

 

Buffers: Create a buffer solution of an assigned pH, then calculate the resultant pH after an acid/base is added.

 

Qualitative Analysis of Cations

Test: Chapter 17

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

18

Chemistry of the Environment

3

27

Earth’s atmosphere,

Outer regions of the atmosphere,

Ozone in upper atmosphere,

Chemistry of troposphere,

World ocean,

Freshwater,

Green chemistry

Determination of Hardness of Water

 

 

Laboratory Journals

 

 

 

19

Chemical Thermo-dynamics

4

28

Spontaneous processes,

Entropy & 2nd law of thermodynamics,

Molecular interpretation of entropy,

Entropy changes in chemical reactions,

Gibbs free energy,

Free energy & temperature,

Free energy & equilibrium constant

Electrochemical Cells and Thermodynamics

Test: Chapter 19

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

20

Electro-chemistry

4

29-30

Oxidation-reduction reactions,

Balancing redox equations,

Voltaic cells,

Cell EMF,

Spontaneity of redox reactions,

Effect of conc. on Cell EMF,

Batteries,

Corrosion,

Electrolysis

 

Electrolysis and Electroplating

Test: Chapter 20

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Ultimate Equations Handbook

 

Laboratory Journals

21

Nuclear Chemistry

4

31

Radioactivity,

Patterns of nuclear stability,

Nuclear transmutations,

Rates of radioactive decay,

Detection of radioactivity,

Energy changes,

Nuclear fission & fusion,

Biological effects

 

Test: Chapter 21

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

 

Laboratory Journals

22

Chemistry of Life

4

32-33

Characteristics of organic molecules,

Hydrocarbons,

Alkanes,

Unsaturated hydrocarbons,

Functional groups,

Compounds w/ carbonyl group,

Proteins,

Carbohydrates,

Nucleic acids

 

Preparation of Esters

Test: Chapter 22

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

23

Chemistry of Metals

And Nonmetals

4

34-36

Hydrogen,

Nobel Gases,

Halogens,

Oxygen,

Nitrogen,

Carbon,

Other groups elements,

Metals,

Metallurgy,

Metal complexes,

Isomerism

 

 

Test: Chapter 23

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

Laboratory Journals

 

 

Semester 2 Assessment

Multiple Choice, Problems, Constructed Response

 

 


 

 

Laboratory Experience

Laboratory investigations are an integral component of this course. These investigations are equivalent to those in a college level laboratory course. The lab work in this course supports, enhances and extends the concepts and principles presented in the classroom. They also provide students with the opportunity to learn and apply new laboratory skills, foster collaborative relationships with others, and improve problem-solving skills.

 

The laboratory investigations are inquiry based, student-centered and are a primary vehicle for learning the fundamental concepts and principles of chemistry.  This includes active use of the well-designed investigation in which students 1) form testable questions and hypotheses, 2) design and conduct appropriate investigative procedures, including the identification and control of appropriate variables, 3) organize, display and critically analyze results, and conduct error analysis, 4) draw inferences, summarize results and develop conclusions, and 5) communicate their results for critique by others.  Laboratory investigations reflect a balance of structured, guided and open-ended inquiry.

 

Students are required to maintain and keep a laboratory journal. Because colleges often require students to present their laboratory materials from AP courses before granting college credit for laboratory, students are expected to retain their laboratory notebooks, reports, and other materials.

 

 


 

Lab Exercise

Description

Goal

Time

Inquiry

Student Inquiry Demonstration Project

Students select and investigate a demonstration of their choice in which they ask and answer a testable question using an experimental, well-designed investigation.

Demonstrate the skills and process of conducting a well-designed experimental investigation, and develop a deeper understanding to a topic of interest, selected by the student. Students present their project to peers.

 

Semester long

Student-conducted

Identification of Substances by Physical Properties

Students determine the physical properties (density, melting point, boiling point, solubility) of a solid and liquid unknown, and then identify it from a list of substances and their properties.

Learn procedures to evaluate physical properties, and use them to identify substances.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Separation of the Components of a Mixture Using Several Methods (Chromatography)

Students are given a mixture of chemicals and asked to separate them. Chromatography is emphasized in a paper and liquid form.

 

Learn the separation techniques of decantation, extraction and Chromatography.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of the Ratios of Reactants in a Chemical Reaction

Students investigate the reaction between ClO- and a S2O3-2 salt to determine the stoichiometric coefficients needed to balance the reaction.

Use method of continuous variations.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Chemical Formulas of Hydrates

Students heat CuSO4 5H2O and other hydrates and determine the water of hydration.

Become familiar with chemical formulas and how they are determined.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of the Concentration of a Solution: Beer’s Law

Students use computer-interfaced colorimeters to determine the concentration of a Cu or Ba salt solution.

Determine the molarity of a salt solution using colorimetric analysis.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Gravimetric Analysis of an insoluble Salt

Students use gravimetric analysis to create an assigned mass of precipitate.

Learn typical techniques of gravimetric analysis by quantitatively calculating and then creating a precipitate and filtering it.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Heat of a Reaction: Experimental vs. Hess

Students construct a calorimeter and use it to determine the heat of neutralization of HCl-NaOH and HC2H3O2-NaOH.

Measure energy changes of neutralization reactions using a calorimeter and a computer-interfaced temperature probe.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Atomic Spectra and Atomic Structure

Students determine the wavelength of hydrogen line emissions, and use spectra emissions to identify elements.

Understand the relationship between emission line spectra and atomic structure.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Molecular Geometries of Covalent Molecules: Lewis Structures and VSEPR Theory

Students make models of covalent molecules, deduce whether geometrical isomers are possible, predict ion structure, state the hybridization of central atoms, and suggest how given species would distort from regular geometries.

Become familiar with Lewis structures, principles of VSEPR theory, and 3-D structures of covalent molecules.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Behavior of Gases: Molar Mass

Students investigate the principles of Boyle’s law, Charles’s law and determine the molar mass of a vapor.

Observe how changes in temperature and pressure affect the volume of a gas, and determine the molar mass of a gas from its mass, temperature, pressure and volume.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Create an assigned volume of gas.

Students create an assigned volume of H2 gas by reacting a calculated mass of Mg with HCl.

Calculate and create a volume of gas, collected in a gas collection tube.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Intermolecular Forces: Evaporation and Intermolecular Attraction

 

Students observe and record the evaporation and hypothesize the inter-molecular attractions between 6 organic liquids.

 

Measure the temperature change of evaporating organic liquids.

2 hrs

Student-conducted

Colligative Properties: Freezing-Point Depression and Molar Mass

Students observe and record the cooling curve for an organic solid and an organic solid/p-dichlorobenzene mix.  They then determine the molar mass of p-dichlorobenzene and repeat the process to determine the molar mass of an unknown substance.

Observe colligative properties and use them to determine the molar mass of a substance.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Rates of Chemical Reactions I: A Clock Reaction

Students measure the effect of concentration upon the rate of reaction of peroxydisulfate ion with iodide ion, and then graph moles consumed to time, to determine rate law and calculate the constant.

Measure the effect of concentration on rate of reaction, determine the order of the reaction, and determine the rate law for a chemical reaction.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Rates of Chemical Reactions II: Rate and Order of H2O2 Decomposition

Students investigate the effects of temperature and a catalyst on the rate and order of reaction for the decomposition of H2O2.

Determine the rate and order of reaction for the decomposition of H2O2.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of Kc using spectrophotometry

 

Students use a spectrophotometer to calculate an equilibrium constant.

 

Use technology to determine an equilibrium constant.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of the Solubility-Product Constant for a Sparingly Soluble Salt

Students use a spectrophotometer to construct calibration curves from absorbance and concentration data, and then calculate the solubility-product constant of Ag2CrO4.

Become familiar with equilibria involving sparingly soluble substances by determining the solubility-product constant.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of Dissociation Constant of a Weak Acid

Students observe and record pH during a titration, create a titration curve of pH versus mL titrant to calculate the ionization constant.

Operate a pH meter, and understand quantitative equilibrium constants.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Qualitative Analysis of Cations

Students perform basic qualitative analysis techniques to identify 10 cations. Students determine the nature of an unknown cation.

 

Learn the basic principles of qualitative analysis and the chemistry of several elements and complex ion formation.

10 hrs

Student-conducted

Titration of Acids and Bases

Students will standardize a NaOH solution and use this to determine the amount of acid in an unknown solution.

Practice the techniques of titration, and determine the amount of acid in an unknown.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Buffers: Create a buffer solution of an assigned pH, then calculate the resultant pH after an acid/base is added.

Student calculate, then create a buffer system; then calculate the pH resulting after the addition of a strong acid or base. The results are tested using an acid or a base.

Calculate and create a buffer solution. Calculate and create a resultant buffer system after a strong acid or base is added to the buffer system.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Determination of Hardness of Water

Students use a titration techniques to determine the concentration of Ca and Mg ions dissolved in various water samples.

Learn techniques of water analysis and become familiar with coordinated complexes.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Electrochemical Cells and Thermodynamics: So, What’s your Voltage?

Students construct electrochemical cells and measure their potential at various temperatures.  Students then calculate ∆G, ∆H, and ∆S from the temperature variations of the measured emf.

Become familiar with the fundamentals of electrochemistry and the Nernst equation, by constructing voltaic cells.

3 hrs

Student-conducted

Electrolysis and Electroplating

Students use electrolysis to electroplate a brass key with copper and calculate the mass of Cu deposited; then weigh the product to compare.

Use Faraday’s equations of electrolysis to calculate mass of deposited electroplate.

 

 

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

Preparation of Esters

Students use laboratory techniques in the synthesis of  methyl salicylate and other esters.

Synthesize organic compounds.

2.5 hrs

Student-conducted

 

 

The College Board describes the requisite laboratory performance skills and recommended experiments. The skills, included in this course, are physical manipulations of ordinary equipment such as: beakers, flasks, test tubes, crucibles, evaporating dishes, spot plates, funnels, etc. The processes and procedures included in the course are laboratory work such as: synthesis of compounds, separations, observing and recording, titration, spectrophotometry, qualitative analysis and gravimetric analysis. 

 

 

Assessment:

 

Assessment and evaluation are essential to learning and teaching. Ongoing assessment and evaluation are significant in supporting student achievement, motivating student performance and providing the basis upon which teachers make meaningful instructional decisions. All aspects of progress in science are measured using multiple methods such as authentic assessments, performance assessments, formative assessments, observational assessments, lab reports, projects, research activities, reports, and conventional summative assessments. Student understanding is evaluated using an assessment cycle that includes pre-test, formative assessments and summative assessments. Pre-tests are used to determine where the student understanding level is, as the unit is begun. The Pre-tests are used by the teacher to plan instruction. Formative assessments are used to check student understanding while learning is occurring, and provide students and teachers with learning progress information. Pre and formative assessments are not used to determine grades. Summative assessments, such as unit and semester tests, evaluate student achievement, and along with other measures such as laboratory and project work are data points used to determine the level of student performance.

 

 

Assessment Type

Goal

Description

Laboratory Journals

To assess understanding of chemistry concepts, principles, and application of skills and processes of the laboratory.

Students maintain laboratory journals of all lab work. It includes lab notes, data, graphs, responses to questions, lab write-ups, error analysis, and further questions.  Students are encouraged to keep their lab journals to demonstrate lab activity in a college AP review.

Chapter Tests

To assess understanding of concepts, principles, problem solving skills, and laboratory materials and skills.

15-50 minute tests containing multiple-choice items, problems to solve, and brief constructed response items.

Semester Assessments

To assess understanding of concepts, principles, problem solving skills, and laboratory materials and skills.

60-90 minute exams containing multiple choice items, problems to solve, and brief constructed response items.

Long-term

Student Inquiry Project

To provide students with an opportunity to investigate a chemical topic of their choice in detail and demonstrate the skills and processes of an experimental, well-designed investigation.

A semester long student research project, in which students ask and answer their own testable question of a chemistry topic of personal interest.  It includes performance and demonstration of project in front of peers.

 

 

 

Support Services:

Science Laboratory Clerk: Teacher and classroom support with solution preparation and laboratory organization.

 

Free after-school academic tutoring: daily.

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Media Center: print and electronic resources.